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Trouble in Tombstone

In 1877, a prospector named Edward Schieffelin was digging for silver at Goose Flats, a desert area some 12 miles from Charleston Arizona.  Some soldiers stationed nearby laughed at Ed and told him of the Apaches that roamed the area and told him, “The only thing you'll find out there is your own tombstone”.

His digging eventually paid off and he discovered a rich vein of silver. He staked a claim and called his mine Tombstone as a reminder of the soldier’s warning. The find prompted a rush of other miners to the area and by December 1878, a notice in the Arizona Weekly Star newspaper read, “Tombstone mill site is now the scene of much activity, Houses, shanties and jackals (huts) are going up rapidly and several families are now on the ground” it ends by noting, “a restaurant has been opened by Mr Ike Clanton”.

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